Weergegeven resultaten: 1 t/m 18 van 18
  1. #1
    Member Bontus's schermafbeelding
    Lid sinds
    14/11/02
    Locatie
    Waasmunster
    Berichten
    14.129
    iTrader
    0

    Poker: Informatiethread Texas Hold'em

    Citaat Oorspronkelijk geplaatst door http://www.pokerinfo.be
    Texas Hold'Em

    Bij Texas Hold'Em is het, zoals bij alle pokervormen, de bedoeling om de beste mogelijke combinatie van 5 kaarten te vormen uit de 7 kaarten die u daarvoor kunt gebruiken. Die 7 kaarten omvatten de 2 eigen kaarten en de 5 kaarten die op de tafel liggen. Wie bij het tonen van de kaarten (showdown genoemd) de beste combinatie kan vormen is de uiteindelijke winnaar van de pot. Vooraleer je echter tot showdown komt zijn er 4 inzetrondes. Op elk van de inzetrondes kan het inzetten gelimiteerd (limit en pol limit) of ongelimiteerd zijn. Daarover straks meer.

    Ronde 1; Preflop

    Het spel begint door 2 kaarten te delen (1 per 1) per persoon en met de beeldzijde naar beneden. Dit zijn jouw eigen kaarten die niemand anders mag zien. Na het delen volgt er een inzetronde. Bij de meeste Hold'em spelen begint het inzetten door 2 'blinde inzetten', 'blinds' genaamd, links van de dealer. Deze blinds zijn verplichte inzetten die moeten gemaakt worden voordat de kaarten gedeeld worden of mogen gezien worden. In deze eerste inzetronde kan men een 'call' maken (d.i. meegaan met de reeds hoogst gemaakte inzet), een raise' maken (d.i. zelf een grotere inzet maken) of 'folden' (d.i. gewoon je kaarten weggooien)

    Het spel verloopt in wijzerzin en begint vanaf de eerste persoon die na de blinds geplaatst zit. De volgende rondes zal het spel beginnen bij de speler die eerst na de dealer zit & de eerste ronde dus de small blind moest plaatsen. Gewoonlijk zijn de blinds 'live' d.w.z. dat ze zelf ook nog mogen raisen als de actie terug bij hen komt.

    Ronde 2; de flop

    In deze ronde worden er 3 kaarten in het midden van de tafel geplaatst met de beeldzijde naar boven, deze zijn 'community cards' (kaarten die iedereen mag gebruiken) en dit wordt de FLOP genoemd. Voor men de flop plaatst dient men eerst de bovenste kaart van het 'deck' (kaartspel) weg te gooien, dit wordt een 'burn' genoemd. Dit wordt gedaan om valspelen zoveel mogelijk te voorkomen.
    Nadat de flop geplaatst is volgt er opnieuw een inzetronde vertrekkende vanaf de small blind.

    Ronde3; de Turn

    Na opnieuw een burn volgt nu een 4e kaart op de tafel die door iedereen mag gebruikt worden, dit noemt men de 'turn' (de beurt) of '4th street'. Hierna volgt weer een inzetronde.

    Ronde 4; de River

    Dan komt, na alweer een burn, de laatste kaart op het 'board' (op de tafel) en deze noemt de 'River' of '5th street'. Hierna volgt een laatste inzetronde waarna de beste hand de pot wint.


    In een gestructureerd ?limit? spel zijn de 'bets' (inzetten) op de turn en river gewoonlijk dubbel zo groot als de bets die men voor en op de flop mag plaatsen. In een 'No limit' spel mag de speler op elk moment zelf beslissen hoeveel hij of zij wil inzetten, enkel de blinds zijn dan vaste bedragen.

    Elke speler tracht om met zijn 2 eigen kaarten en de 5 kaarten op het board en zo goed mogelijke poker hand te maken van 5 kaarten. (Zie Hand Rankings). Zo kan het dus zijn dat je je beide eigen kaarten gebruikt met 3 van het board, 1 van je eigen kaarten met 4 van het board of alle 5 de board kaarten gebruikt!

    Als 2 of meerdere personen een gelijke hand maken dan wordt de pot onder deze personen verdeeld.





    Hoe Sit 'n go's spelen? (instructional video)
    http://www.bigpoker.ca/resources/video/530sitngo_01.rar

    Hoe Limit Hold'em spelen? (instructional video)
    http://www.bigpoker.ca/resources/video/1-2Holdem_01.rar

    Handrankings:
    http://www.pokerinfo.be/index.php?topic=Handranking

    10 geboden voor poker te spelen:
    http://www.pokerinfo.be/images/allerlei/10verboden.jpg

    Internetbetalingen beheren:
    Via MoneyBookers: https://www.moneybookers.com/app/?rid=1269599
    Via Neteller: http://www.neteller.com/home/index.jsf

    Outs in verschillende situaties flop/turn:
    http://www.pokerinfo.be/index.php?topic=Odds

    Video met uitleg over pot odds/outs/implied odds:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=chQ2Dso3o7U

    Website om outs te berekenen via Java applet:
    http://www.cardplayer.com/poker_odds/texas_holdem

    Software om outs te berekenen met veel meer mogelijkheden waaronder random hands toekennen (handig in SB vs BB situatie of Button vs blinds):
    http://www.pokerstove.com/

    No deposit bonus op PartyPoker: $50+$25 (stappen strikt volgen!):
    http://www.pokercodes.com/pokerplayers/?refcode=11064

    Site met diverse pokertips:
    http://www.pokertips.org/

    Speelbare handen met 9/10 spelers, mbt positie en spelstijl:
    http://www.philnolimits.com/handguides.php

    Pokerspecifiek forum:
    http://www.twoplustwo.com/
    Laatst gewijzigd door Bontus; 11 april 2007 om 16:47

  2. #2
    Approved 9-lifer Ether's schermafbeelding
    Lid sinds
    27/08/02
    Locatie
    Beernem
    Berichten
    25.605
    iTrader
    0
    http://www.philnolimits.com/handguides.php


    Vinnek ook wel een handige site!

  3. #3
    Member Lemon's schermafbeelding
    Lid sinds
    3/08/02
    Locatie
    Birmingham
    Berichten
    2.097
    iTrader
    26 (100%)
    http://www.pokertips.org/

    Ook een zeer handige site met zeer veel tips om te spelen bij verschillende stakes.

  4. #4
    Member Costanza's schermafbeelding
    Lid sinds
    13/11/04
    Locatie
    vlaanderen
    Berichten
    1.730
    iTrader
    1 (100%)
    Travdaddy11's strategy article on Six-seat SNGs "Six Seat Madness!"

    Understanding the strategy of the 6 seat table can be both fun and profitable for all low limit players. I say low limit, meaning 5 and 10 dollar, because every game is the same. Very predicatable aggression and chip flow.

    The six seat format scares people into aggression. So any good player should sit tight for the first few blind escalations. The key to success is patience. Forget the typical strategies of Button raises and proctecting your blinds. There is no room for that nonsense. Pot odds are something else you should reconsider. The Key is Patience and your own trapping ability.

    Remember one thing: DON’T RAISE. The raise is coming from another person seated at the table. You should fold any marginal hand very early in all six seaters. By Marginal I mean anything really other than high pocket pairs down to A-10, KQ type hands.
    Pretty much, play only the hands you are prepared to call a raise with, because as I stated before….. It is coming. You might find that hard to do, but the information you gather letting the other players kill off each other is valuable. Don’t really start playing until you are in the final four.

    Pay attention to who is doing the raising and the cards they show. As in any game, that is probably the key, but even more so in a 6 seater. Folding is your friend: Folding keeps you out of pots that you had no business in in the first place. So fold like you have never folded before. Folding also builds confidence in the other players at the table. A couple of Call-Fold to a raise, and they will think you are spineless and can be scared out of every pot. PERFECT!!!

    Don’t be afraid to get a little short stacked. You never really are because a double up is coming no matter what. Be confident in that. Take the early hands off and watch the others. The best scenario is for one player to take a substantial chip lead. This works for you in two ways.
    It gives that player the confidence that you will later use against him.
    It get the rest of the table scrambeling for second.
    All this aggression is exactly what a patient player needs to succeed. Always see your chip stack in relation to the blinds, DO NOT compare it to the chip leaders or you will fall into the same scramble that you hope the others get into. So an 800 stack with 30 or 60 blinds isn’t nearly as bad as you think. You will still be able to move, and can draw fire on your all in.

    There are a few times when a call is good. When you are protected by a stack, meaning a big stack in early position has called and one or two players are left to act. You can make a call with less of a hand because the smaller stacks wont push against the big stack, and if they do you get out for a decent price. These are the times that 8-7, 8-10, 9-6 suited type hands are valuable. They are versatile enough to beat a big Pocket pair and the people at the table will never see them coming. Perfect for a slow play. But let the chip leader do the work for you. Let him take out the scrambelers. They will fall in his wake one way or another. The chip leader may switch and usually does. The early confidence rarely stands up. So try to identify the next leader before he does. Pay closer attention to his play.

    OK so lets assume that you have lasted to the final four. Big stack is at 3500, and you are around 1200. Blinds should be around 60-100. You will need to get aggressive now. You have gathered enough information to figure out the chip leader thinks Q6 off is a premium hand. Raise with Premium hands now. Try to get action on your good hands, but you can now afford to call with J10, 910. They key is to find versitle hands. Hands that can win in more ways than one and leave you with plenty of outs if you should need them.
    Patience is still the key, if you cannot win the hand fold. Don’t let pride, or the feeling of pot commitment lead you to call with nothing. That double up is still coming, and it will happen. The time to push is when you flop top pair, push right away. You can pick up the blinds at this point which will keep you going until you hit your double up. I say the double up is coming over and over. It really is coming. One big pot and a double up and you are in second place. You are actually playing for a heads up with the chip leader.
    Let the chip leader do the work unless you see an opportunity. Be careful on your reads and you should be OK.

    You have given up that you slow play everything at this point so you are going to need to change that. Be super aggressive from now on. You want to see flops before you push. This is the best way to ensure that you are getting your money in with the hand it deserves. If you should get the inevitable suckout remember: You had your chips in with the best hand and 70% or more of the time you are going to win that same race. Be confident in your skills enough to head back to the lobby for another shot at it.
    Once there are two left stop and appreciate your work. Then go to work on the other guy. You are now in a heads up battle and they are easy to win. At least a player of your skill should believe it.

    Once you are heads up the game becomes easy. You will be forced to call most blinds, if not all. But the minute you see the opportunity push. You may not win all heads up battles, but you will always cash if you are patient enough to hang around for second.
    One thing about Heads up. At this point in the game the blinds are so big that catching up is only a matter of two hands at the most. So continue to be patient.

  5. #5
    Member prozackx's schermafbeelding
    Lid sinds
    16/01/03
    Locatie
    aub
    Berichten
    1.447
    iTrader
    0
    www.twoplustwo.com

    pokerforum

  6. #6
    Member Kn0t's schermafbeelding
    Lid sinds
    17/07/02
    Locatie
    #sskclan
    Berichten
    339
    iTrader
    0
    http://www.pokersitandgoreport.com/

    gratis sit'n'go tutorial video reeks. Wel registratie nodig, je krijgt de links naar de videos opgestuurd via mail.

  7. #7
    Member Knoxie's schermafbeelding
    Lid sinds
    18/07/03
    Berichten
    239
    iTrader
    0
    preflop strategy:
    betten, folden of raisen? hier het antwoord door indeling in pocketgroups.

    Pre-flop Strategy

    Pre-flop No Limit Texas Holdem Hand Rankings - Groups 0 to 2

    One of the most difficult and yet crucial decisions you will make when playing no limit Texas holdem will be whether to even play your hand. This decision should not be made haphazardly. Hitting your card on the flop only to end up with the second best hand can be very costly. Playing mediocre cards can cost you if you are not able to let them go later in the hand. So, first of all, you should only be looking to play the best hands possible. David Sklansky and Mason Malmuth, co-authors of Hold’em Poker and Advanced Holdem Poker, were the first to apply rankings to the starting 2-card hands, and place them in groupings with advice on how to play those groups. This is a great starting point to help with your decision on which hands to play. We absolutely recommend that you read Advanced Holdem Poker, and keep it as a reference that you can refer back to you.

    There is group of folks at the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon that developed a Texas holdem computer simulation and tested Sklansky’s hand rankings. They created multiple table environments, ranging from extremely tight to loose and crazy, and let them play millions of hands. They’ve suggested some alterations to Sklansky’s hand rankings and groupings.

    However, both rankings and grouping are based on the game of limit poker. I believe there are further adjustments to these starting hands for the game of no limit poker. This is because of the implied odds of hitting certain hands, particularly hitting trips or better when holding a pocket pair and hitting flushes (the nut flush in particular). The cost of playing these hands is very cheap compared to the potential pot and payout. For example, at the tables I play, I can see a flop for $.50 when the average pot size can be $20. This means that you can play more hands in more positions, but you must still be cognizant of the fact that all your chips could be at stake on any one hand, and you must still play very disciplined after the flop to let go of weaker hands.

    So here is a summary of the playable hands:

    Group 0: AA KK

    I’ve pulled out these two particular powerhouses and put them in their own group. These two hands are by far the strongest hands possible, and have the best odds of beating any other hand. These are hands you should feel comfortable going ALL-IN on pre-flop, however that usually isn’t the best way to play them since the other players will be likely to fold, leaving you with just the blinds ($.75 at the tables I play).

    I also recommend that you do not slow-play these two hands, in whatever position, in hopes of keeping more players in. There seems to be a lot of debate on this particular subject, but I can only speak to my own experience, and clearly raising with these two hands is a must in my strategy. I personally prefer winning a smaller pot with reduced risk than potentially losing a larger pot by accepting more risk. Not to mention, if I lose AA to a junk hand, I could go on tilt which would adversely affect the rest of my play.

    The amount of the raise depends on my position, the number of players already in (assuming no raises yet), and the general table environment (loose, tight). Ideally, I like to play these hands against 2-3 opponents. So based on all that information, I’ll try to make a raise that is likely callable by 2-3 opponents. In practice, that ends up being a raise of $2.50 - $5.00, possibly more in late position if there are already several callers and I know the table to be loose. If the pot is raised prior to my turn, I will look to re-raise the pot by a margin larger than what it was raised. If the pot is then re-raised back to me, depending on how much money I have or my opponent has, I will possibly go all-in.

    However, the situation does arise where my KK may be up against AA. Yes, this happens more often than you would think (when you play multiple tables online, you come across every situation routinely). Up to this point, I have not yet successfully laid down my KK against AA pre-flop, I’ve lost that particular scenario a handful of times. However, I’ve also never laid down my KK against QQ, JJ, or TT pre-flop that have been played similarly. So, overall, I think you stick with your KK unless you really think you know a player has AA – ie. – a tight, conservative player goes all-in for $50 preflop, it probably isn’t worth the call.

    Group 1: QQ JJ AKs

    These are the next three strongest hands (in order). I will also raise with these hands, call raises with these hands, and maybe re-raise once. I will also consider folding them pre-flop if I sense I am beat – ie. – player raises $2.00, I re-raise another $2.00, if I am then re-raised huge, like $15 or all-in, I’ll possibly let my QQ go, and probably let my JJ, AKs go, depending on the opponent and what I know about his play.

    The situation above, folding QQ pre-flop, is obviously rare. But I have, on two occasions, folded QQ to a better pocket pair pre-flop (AA, KK).

    Sometimes, it becomes obvious your opponent has AA or KK, they are normally tight, conservative players but are re-raising or going all-in pre-flop – they appear to have no sense of fear of losing the hand. In that scenario, you should consider folding your hand, AA vs. QQ or JJ, you are a 82% to 18% underdog, AA vs AKs, you are even worse at 88% to 12% underdog. Sklansky also rates these top five hands in this same order.

    Group 2: TT AK AQs AJs KQs

    The Carnegie Mellon group ranks AK above KQs in overall power, this is a slight change to Sklansky’s rankings. I further moved AK above AQs and AJs, I believe AK plays stronger than these suited hands in the no limit arena. And, clearly, AK is a dominating hand over AQs, AJs, and KQs heads up.

    Again, I raise with all the Group 2 hands, usually between $1.50 - $3.00 depending on the action, my position, and the table environment. My raises tend to be a little less when I am in early position. I am very sensitive to re-raises with these hands. Depending on the player and the size of the re-raise, I will usually call, sometimes fold, and rarely re-raise.

    These are the top ten starting hands and I look to raise with each and every one of them from all positions.

  8. #8
    Member Knoxie's schermafbeelding
    Lid sinds
    18/07/03
    Berichten
    239
    iTrader
    0
    continued..

    Pre-flop No Limit Texas Holdem Hand Rankings - Groups 3 to 4
    After the Big 10 starting hands, I do not necessarily automatically raise pre-flop from any position. My play becomes more selective.

    Group 3: AQ 99 ATs KJs QJs KTs

    Sklansky’s Group 3 has been slightly re-arranged by the Carnegie Mellon group, which I've further modified in the ranking above. I've moved AQ to the top of the Group 3, and also moved 99 to the second position because in the game of no limit holdem, I feel these hand plays much better (I will further explain this below). The Carnegie Mellon group exchanged one hand with Sklansky's Group 4, dropping JTs and moving KTs up to Group 3. This makes sense to me and I value KTs above JTs in my play as well.

    For these Group 3 hands, I look to raise pre-flop with the first two hands (AQ, 99), from any position, if there have not been any raises. My raise will tend to be smaller, $1-$2.50 depending on my position and the table environment, the raise being less in early position and a little more in later position.

    I look to raise pre-flop with the second two hands (ATs, KJs), in mid to late position, if there have not been any raises, again in the range of $1-$2.

    If I am faced with a raise, I will probably call if it is small on AQ and 99 (less than $2), and fold all the other hands to any raises. I will rarely re-raise – only if I know the opponent raising totally sucks (weak, stupid, loose/maniac style of player).

    Even though these first four hands of Group 3 are strong, they are huge underdogs to typically raised hands – ATs and AQ are dominated by AK, KJs is dominated by AK and AJ, so be careful playing these hands against a raise.

    With the bottom two hands (QJs, KTs), I vary between raising small or limping in. If I am faced with just the blinds, I will raise with these hands hoping to win it right then. Against larger raises, I will fold these hands. Against a small raise (<$2), I will most likely fold QJs and KTs.

    I will play all Group 3 hands from all positions.

    Group 4: 88 AJ KQ QTs A9s JTs AT A8s

    Sklansky’s Group 4 has been significantly changed by the Carnegie Mellon group, and I agree with those changes. However, I disagree with the order of the hands within the group. I've moved AJ, KQ, and AT up within the group to reflect differences in playability between no limit and limit holdem. Based on the calculations of the Carnegie Mellon group, the suited connector junk has dropped off Group 4, being replaced by more powerful hands. Of the hands above, I tend to raise small ($.50 – $2.00) with 88, AJ and KQ, but rarely if at all with the other hands. I will cold call only the smallest raises with 88, AJ, KQ.

    If I have already limped in, and am raised, I will only call small raises with these hands (depending on the number of opponents!), otherwise I will fold. Again, the problem with the above hands is that they make a good second place hand, and these are losing hands that can be costly. To call a raise with AT is asking for disaster, because the player raising could easily have AK, AQ, or AJ. So if you flop the ace, you still cannot be assured that you have the best hand. I want to be the one who raises going into a pot. And I do not want to be calling raises going into a pot. This is a key point to my strategy.

    I will play Group 4 hands from any position, but look to raise only with 88, AJ or KQ.

    One other item to note at this point - In the game of no limit, it is often too expensive to call bets with drawing hands. For example, with hands like QTs, A9s, and JTs, you are really looking to hit the straight or the flush. However, if someone has top pair with a strong kicker they should be betting you out of the hand, so you often times will never see the turn or river card. This is one major distinction between the hands played in limit holdem vs no limit holdem. In the game of limit, it is often correct to call bets with a straight draw or flush draw hand because the pot odds justify the call. In no limit, the reverse is normally true, that you are not getting good pot odds to make the call, and often have to fold your drawing hands. Therefore, these drawing hands are not as strong in no limit as they may play in limit poker.

  9. #9
    Member Knoxie's schermafbeelding
    Lid sinds
    18/07/03
    Berichten
    239
    iTrader
    0
    continued some more..

    Pre-flop No Limit Texas Holdem Hand Rankings - Group 5

    Ok, now here's where the play gets a bit more tricky. These hands are pretty delicate yet still playable.

    Group 5: KJ 77 QJ KT QT JT A7s K9s Q9s T9s J9s

    Now at this point, I start to depart from Sklansky and the Carnegie Mellon group's hand groupings. Both parties above have 18 hands in their Group 5, I've broken out my top 11 from Carnegie's 18 hands and rearranged the order based on my strategy and how I play these hands.

    For these Group 5 hands, I may raise small ($1-$2) on the first two hands only (KJ, 77) and only from late position. In early position, I will limp in with these two hands (KJ, 77). Of the remaining 9 hands of Group 5, I hope to limp in and see the flop cheaply, and may not even play some of these from early position, depending on my feel of the table.

    Against raises, I will only call small raises with 77 (usually $.50-$1.50), and the other hands I will usually fold to any raise. If I have already limped in, and the bet is raised, I will again only call small raises, otherwise I will lay it down. Again, this all depends on the number of opponents in the pot and my position. The more the opponents, and the later my position, the more willing I am to call small raises.

    A couple of important points from my personal strategy that I'd like to reiterate here. The first is that if the pot is to be raised pre-flop, I want to be the one doing the raising. Otherwise, I'm looking to get out of the hand. (Read those last two sentences one more time!) It's easy to just limp in and then call a raise since you have $.50 already invested, but that one simple mistake could cost you big. A mediocre hand is easily dominated by a hand that is strong enough to raise the pot, placing you at a huge disadvantage.

    This leads to my second point. It is very important to realize the strength of your cards and AVOID BEING IN A DOMINATED POSITION. A big part of No limit Texas holdem is the game of domination, which very simply means having better cards than your opponents to give you a better chance of winning. You are looking to catch players in a dominated state, while not getting caught having your hand dominated. Being dominated means having 3 or less outs against another hand. So, let's take a look at QJ as an example:

    QJ is dominated by AQ, KQ, AJ, KJ, and also by AA, KK, QQ, and JJ. Now, there are 12 possible ways to get dealt AQ, KQ, AJ, and KJ, 6 possible ways to be dealt AA, KK, and 3 possible ways to be dealt QQ, and JJ. So, in terms of exact combinations of these hands, there are 66 specific hands that will have QJ dominated.

    QJ is an underdog to AQ, KQ, AJ, KJ at about 26% vs 74%.
    QJ is an underdog to AA and KK at about 15% vs 85%.
    QJ is an underdog to QQ at about 11% vs 88%.
    QJ is an underdog to JJ at about 33% vs 67%.

    Obviously, by looking at the percentages above, you are in big trouble if your hand is dominated, and 66 hands will do that to you.

    Now, comparing QJ to KJ, KJ is dominated by much less hands (AK, AJ, AA, KK, QQ, JJ), which totals only 42 specific hands. So, you can see how much stronger KJ is over QJ. 77 is only dominated by 88, 99, TT, JJ, QQ, KK, and AA, which totals 42 specific hands.

    Ok, so hopefully you get the point. A hand like QJ may look appealing, especially after an hour of getting dealt 72o over and over again. But after closer inspection, you can see how delicate and beatable this hand is, so you should be very careful calling raises with these mediocre hands.

    Getting back to these Group 5 hands, I will play all these hands from any position, with maybe strength on KJ and 77, but usually limping in with the rest of the hands and very willing to lay them down to any demonstration of strength.

    If I am playing on a tough, tight table (which is not the norm for me because I usually just leave), then I do not play the last three hands at all (Q9s, T9s, J9s) unless I'm in late position only. I think that's all I have for this grouping, we're in the tough sections now. It's easy to play awesome cards, but here is where your strategy and experience will make or break you. Ok, let's move on.

  10. #10
    Member Knoxie's schermafbeelding
    Lid sinds
    18/07/03
    Berichten
    239
    iTrader
    0
    and the last part..

    Pre-flop No Limit Texas Holdem Hand Rankings - Group 6
    There are still some good hands yet to be played, and these have huge upside potential if you hit(Limping in with big implied odds is the idea here). Here are my Group 6 hands:

    Group 6: 66 55 44 33 22 A5s A6s A4s A3s A2s

    This group is a clear departure from Sklansky and the Carnegie Mellon group's hand groupings. Sklansky recommends playing these hands only in late position. However, for the no limit game, these hands have huge implied odds, and I will play these Group 6 hands from all positions. I look to limp in to the pot with each hand, and very rarely raise with any of these hands (the only situation being to buy the blinds on the button on a weak, passive table!).

    The first half of Group 6 are low pairs. Low pairs are not rags! These could be very powerful hands if you hit the set on the flop. And if you do not hit the set, you are looking to get out of the hand. It's very simple to play these first five hands of Group 6, and they can be very profitable.

    The odds of hitting the 3-of-a-kind or better is about 12%, so let's round that up and say for every 8 low pocket pairs you play, you'll hit the set or better on one hand. Now if you can limp in on all eight hands, that will cost you $4.00 (8 * $.50). But then on that eighth hand, when you've flopped trips, you will most likely be the huge favorite to win that hand, and you will also most likely take down a very nice pot. Hitting trips with these pocket pairs gives you an extremely powerful hand that is practically undetectable. So, when you do hit that hand, will you be able to make back that $4.00 previously invested to see the flop? Easily!!! If a flop comes like A 6 2, and you're holding pocket 66's, one of your opponents will most likely call you all the way down if they are holding the Ace. With a little deception (slow-play, check-raise), you may even be able to get your opponent to go all-in against you!

    Because of the simplicity of playing these low pairs, and the implied odds associated with hitting that set on the flop, I will Usually call small raises with these hands ($.50 - $1.50). So, if each pair now costs me $1 to see the flop, I would need to make at least $8 when I do hit. Again, I think this is not only possible, but most likely. However, if the table is tough, tricky, or very tight, calling raises with these low pairs could be asking for trouble. What if, in the above scenario, your opponent raises $1, you call, and the same flop hits: A 6 2. But, this time, your opponent is holding AA. Now, you'll be the one losing your entire bankroll!

    So, here is how I play these first five hands - I try to see the flop for cheap, which means limping in or calling small raises. If the raises are any larger, you have to use your best judgement, considering your opponent who raised, the number of opponents in the pot, and your opponents' chip stacks. One of the strategies on calling raises with mid to low pocket pairs is that the call should be automatic if the raise is <5> 10% of your chip stack (ie - if you sit down with $25, automatically call up to $1.25 and automatically fold if raise is greater than $2.50). But you also need to consider your opponent's chip stack - does he have enough chips to pay you off if you hit trips, can he cover your all-in? And if there are multiple opponents in the pot, does the pot + the potential justify making the call? So, in the case of where the raise is between 5% and 10% of your chip stack, this is where you must consider all these facets to make the right decision.

    If I miss the set or better on the flop, I look to get out of the hand to any show of strength. If there is a small bet post flop, like $.50, then I will consider my pot odds (I have 2 outs, so I have a 8.4% shot of hitting my trips over the turn and river). In most cases, I fold these hands after the flop.

    The bottom five hands of Group 6 are more difficult to play. Obviously, you are looking to hit the flush. The odds of hitting the flush or four to the flush on the flop is also around 12%. Having the nut flush draw after the flop is a decent hand, and you may be able to semi-bluff the pot with the flush draw, preferably in late position.

    You may also win if you pair up Aces, however this is a precarious situation since you have no kicker. If I do hit the Ace on the flop with one of these hands (14.5%), I will usually bet it to test the waters. If I get raised then I know to let go of the hand. If I'm in early position, I will sometimes check it (sometimes!), to see if anyone else will bet aggressively on the Ace, and then use my best judgement on whether to make that call.

    I will not call raises with this second half of Group 6 hands, and on a tough table, I may not play these Ace suited hands at all in early position. Ok, that's it for Group 6, and that also completes the spectrum of core hands that I play from all positions.

  11. #11
    Approved 9-lifer Ether's schermafbeelding
    Lid sinds
    27/08/02
    Locatie
    Beernem
    Berichten
    25.605
    iTrader
    0
    Kga er grotendeels mee akkoord, maar de laatste tijd hebbek toch serieus de neiging om raises tot 3-4xBB te callen met gelijk welk pocket pair in m'n handen...

    Zeker lage, na de flop zijn ze zo makkelijk te folden als je nix hit, en als je ze hit ist in 95% van de gevallen echt wel kassa kassa, zeker als em een pair maakt

  12. #12
    Member ganz's schermafbeelding
    Lid sinds
    14/07/03
    Locatie
    Herselt
    Berichten
    1.407
    iTrader
    0
    Heads up lijkt me dit niet aan te raden. Wanneer er meerdere spelers in de hand zijn oke, dan is de pot groter dan kan het waarschijnlijk winstgevend zijn op termijn. Maar denk eraan dat je kans om je set te hitten niet zo supergroot is eh.
    (Your chance of hitting a set, which is typically the only way a small or medium pair will win, is around 7.5-1.)

  13. #13
    Member _DKsissor_'s schermafbeelding
    Lid sinds
    6/01/05
    Locatie
    blabal
    Berichten
    7.939
    iTrader
    1 (100%)
    For example, suppose you hold K 8 in the big blind. Someone raises in middle position, 4 players call, and you call. The flop is K 10 2. The small blind bets out.

    Some players would fold here, which is a horrible mistake. While your kicker is not the greatest, you are getting great odds for your money. Not only do you have top pair, yu might end up hitting trips or a two-pair. Sure, there is a good chance someone else will win the pot, but there is so much money in the pot that you should go ahead and call at least one bet.

    A fold can often be the biggest mistake in poker. Please read When to Fold and Big Mistakes for more information about this.
    wat vinden jullie hiervan? Mij lijkt het eigelijk redelijk dom om daar nog mee te gaan bij een raise.
    Alé bij 5 man is de kans toch veel te groot dat iemand met een pair met hogere kicker of iets hoger zit dan dat gij nog eens meegaat in de hoop uw trisk of two pair te hitten? Ik zou het callen als er 2 man(die niet supertight aan het spelen zijn) ofzo meegaat maar bij een halve tafel toch niet. dat lijkt me gewoon waste of money
    // kbent zelfs niet mee eens dat die K8 calt bij een raise of hij zou heel big stacked moeten zitte

  14. #14
    Approved 9-lifer Ether's schermafbeelding
    Lid sinds
    27/08/02
    Locatie
    Beernem
    Berichten
    25.605
    iTrader
    0
    Citaat Oorspronkelijk geplaatst door ganz Bekijk bericht
    Heads up lijkt me dit niet aan te raden. Wanneer er meerdere spelers in de hand zijn oke, dan is de pot groter dan kan het waarschijnlijk winstgevend zijn op termijn. Maar denk eraan dat je kans om je set te hitten niet zo supergroot is eh.
    (Your chance of hitting a set, which is typically the only way a small or medium pair will win, is around 7.5-1.)
    Yup yup, kheb het heel zeker over FR he.. Omwille van de implied odds is het denkek in 90% van de gevallen verkeerd om een kleine - gemiddelde raise niet te callen. Zeker als er nog wa man mee is.

    En zelfs in heads-up zou ik het denkek nog callen, bij heads-up is een pair vaak de winning hand, dus waarom niet. Heads-up en 88 of hoger is denkek bij mij zelfs all-in (kheb nu natuurlijk nie zoveel ervaring met heads-up)



    Citaat Oorspronkelijk geplaatst door rammsein Bekijk bericht
    wat vinden jullie hiervan? Mij lijkt het eigelijk redelijk dom om daar nog mee te gaan bij een raise.
    Alé bij 5 man is de kans toch veel te groot dat iemand met een pair met hogere kicker of iets hoger zit dan dat gij nog eens meegaat in de hoop uw trisk of two pair te hitten? Ik zou het callen als er 2 man(die niet supertight aan het spelen zijn) ofzo meegaat maar bij een halve tafel toch niet. dat lijkt me gewoon waste of money
    // kbent zelfs niet mee eens dat die K8 calt bij een raise of hij zou heel big stacked moeten zitte
    Kvind het ook maar een heel rare redenering, K8 is feitelijk een automatishe fold, zelfs zonder raise. Zeker als BB, compleet out of position..
    Genoeg man die raised met QJ, KQ, KJ,...
    FC Bruges

  15. #15
    Member Knoxie's schermafbeelding
    Lid sinds
    18/07/03
    Berichten
    239
    iTrader
    0
    Citaat Oorspronkelijk geplaatst door reteiP Bekijk bericht
    Hoe Sit 'n go's spelen? (instructional video)
    http://www.bigpoker.ca/resources/video/530sitngo_01.rar

    Hoe Limit Hold'em spelen? (instructional video)
    http://www.bigpoker.ca/resources/video/1-2Holdem_01.rar
    Dat eerste filmpje helemaal uitgezien, zeer leerrijk voor beginners als ik. Al vrees ik dat op tafels met een veel lagere buy-in en dus ook prijzenpot deze praktijken niet altijd toe te passen zijn omdat men daar minder bang heeft om te verliezen dan bij een 530 dollar buy-in met een prijzen pot van 5000 dollar. Bovendien werken de helft van zijn techniekjes enkel als je een groot stackvoordeel hebt tov de andere spelers. Wél knap hoe die gast kan readen, hij weet altijd op voorhand als ik verhoog naar dat bedrag dan flopt die speler en elke keer als hij zo'n voorspelling deed kwam die ook wel uit. Ik denk dat dat bij online poker vooral een kwestie van ervaring is (en natuurlijk goed opletten naar andere moves van de tegenspelers). Anyway, voor beginners is dit filmpje wel een aanrader, ik denk dat ik het nog wel eens terug ga zien en achteraf zijn speelstijl ook eens ga uitproberen.

    het tweede filmpje gaat over 4 tafels tegelijk en vind ik enorm moeilijk om te volgen.. ik heb het na 5 minuten terug afgezet omdat het allemaal te snel ging voor mij en ik er dus toch niks van opstak.

  16. #16
    Member Bontus's schermafbeelding
    Lid sinds
    14/11/02
    Locatie
    Waasmunster
    Berichten
    14.129
    iTrader
    0
    Vond het ook mooi hoe hij zijn percentage outs perfect schatte op de flop (met zen set) waar hij die ander op 10-J en een straight zet, en correct.

  17. #17
    Approved 9-lifer NotoriousP's schermafbeelding
    Lid sinds
    9/07/06
    Locatie
    Sint-Katelijne-
    Berichten
    14.218
    iTrader
    150 (100%)
    Iemand met wat toernooi strategiën? Speel voornamelijk cash games & sitngo's.. moet ik dit zien als een enorme grote sitngo?

  18. #18
    Member Devilman's schermafbeelding
    Lid sinds
    17/05/03
    Berichten
    229
    iTrader
    0
    Op het forum op www.tlpoker.be wordt er wel gesproken over tornooi strategiën/structures.

    Toch al wat geleerd :-)

Discussie informatie

Users Browsing this Thread

Op dit moment bekijken 1 gebruikers deze discussie. (0 leden en 1 gasten)

Regels voor berichten

  • Je mag geen nieuwe discussies starten
  • Je mag niet reageren op berichten
  • Je mag geen bijlagen versturen
  • Je mag niet je berichten bewerken
  •